Share Black Stories on Instagram

Read about it on the Instagram Info Center

You can #ShareBlackStories by using new creative tools, conceptualized by Black voices at Instagram, including camera effects inspired by the rich cultural history of telling stories through African mud cloth patterns (seen above). Available now, these effects touch on themes of family, bravery and good fortune — to use them, open the Stories camera and tap on the effects icon. There are also custom templates designed by community illustrator Loveis Wise and a new #ShareBlackStories sticker in the Stories sticker tray to try out.

Follow the #ShareBlackStories hashtag to see more of the amazing stories our community creates. This month and beyond, we’re excited see this come to life. The camera effects and sticker are available on iOS and Android in the US.

— André Llewellyn & Joy Ofodu, Instagram Brand

Essence: Instagram Attempts To Save Black History Month With #ShareBlackStories

People: Instagram Launches #ShareBlackStories Campaign to Celebrate Black History Month

Elite Daily: Instagram’s New Black History Month 2019 Feature Includes Stickers, Camera Effects, & More

AdWeek: Instagram Is Encouraging People to #ShareBlackStories for Black History Month

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To honor the black community on Instagram and celebrate #BlackHistoryMonth, we’re kicking off a new series: #ShareBlackStories. This month and beyond, follow along and share your unique perspective using the hashtag. For artist Tawny Chatmon (@tawnychatmon), #ShareBlackStories, and Black History Month in general, is “not about having other people validate us. It’s about us celebrating ourselves — celebrating ourselves and creating that work that we want to be in this world.” Tawny creates compelling images by fusing together black history and art history — sometimes quite literally. For one of her series, “Deeply Embedded,” she took portraits of young girls and placed images of African women from the U.S. National Archives in their hair. “If you see work like this with black faces, it’s going to have some effect on you,” says Tawny, who lives outside of Washington, DC. The inspiration for these photo collages came after Tawny read about the real-life stories of children who were sent home from school because of their hairstyles and their natural hair. “It became personal,” Tawny explains. “I have three kids. So I just started feeling like, these are my kids. They are my responsibility.” Today on our story, we visit Tawny’s studio to see more of her powerful portraits. Photo by @tawnychatmon

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To honor the black community on Instagram and celebrate #BlackHistoryMonth, we’re sharing another story in our series #ShareBlackStories. This month and beyond, follow along and share your unique perspective using the hashtag. Afro-Latina artist Uzumaki Cepeda (@uzumaki.gallery) started making her safe space fantasies when she moved to L.A. in 2016. At first, her fuzzy installations (entire rooms covered in neon faux fur) were a colorful way to re-create her childhood, but soon, they transformed into something more powerful. “I was like, ‘This is making people feel comfortable — all different types of people,’” says the 23-year-old artist of Dominican heritage. Besides providing a sense of safety, Uzumaki’s artwork offered her insight into privilege. “It’s taught me the value of space,” says Uzumaki, who was born in the Bronx and grew up in the Dominican Republic. “Acknowledging my privilege as a light-skinned person of color and giving space for black women to say what they have to say.” Step inside one of Uzumaki’s spaces, today on our story. Photo of @uzumaki.gallery by @munachiosegbu

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The realest #shareblackstories

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WOW. Thank you so much @instagram! I had so much fun with you guys last night at the #shareblackstories event! Also, huge thanks to @overbrook @jonbrandoncruz @dougiecash @willsmith and @jadapinkettsmith for allowing this to happen! This is huge!🤟🏾😊 hair by: @ladya_artistry #MakingHistory #Trailblazer #Pioneer #NASCARD4D #Xcaliburpitschool #BrehannaDaniels #Repost @instagram ・・・ To honor the black community on Instagram and celebrate #BlackHistoryMonth, we’re sharing another story in our series #ShareBlackStories. This month and beyond, follow along and share your unique perspective using the hashtag. For Brehanna Daniels (@brehannadaniels), Black History Month is about celebrating groundbreaking accomplishments. “It’s amazing to see people that look like me accomplish and break barriers,” says the 24-year-old. Brehanna is breaking barriers herself, as the first black woman to be a part of a pit crew in a NASCAR series race. “Once I found that out, I realized it was much bigger than me,” she says. In 2016, Brehanna graduated from Norfolk State University, a historically black college, on a full basketball scholarship. The lifelong athlete then joined NASCAR’s Drive for Diversity program, but she admits that before that she didn’t see a lot of people in the racing league who looked like her. Brehanna now hopes to be an inspiration for other black women out there who might feel the same way. “Why not be that change? Hopefully, people will see me and more faces like mine will want to join,” she says. Check out our IGTV channel now to learn more about Brehanna’s story in a short #ShareBlackStories film. ✨

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Let’s keep talking about it!

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